Knee

Conditions & Treatments
Anchorage: (907) 782-4729
Wasilla: (907) 885-2559
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Contact & Locations
OPA features several of Alaska’s knee doctors with extensive experience in the latest treatment options available. Several also have additional subspecialty training in Sports Medicine, Total Joint Replacement and Orthopedic Trauma.

Common Knee Conditions

Knee Pain
The knee is the largest joint in the body, and one of the most easily injured. It is made up of four main structures: bones, cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. Three bones meet to form your knee joint: your thigh bone (femur), shinbone (tibia), and kneecap (patella). The flexibility of the knee makes it prone to injury.

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Knee Sprain
The knee is the largest joint in the body, and one of the most easily injured. It is made up of four main structures: bones, cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. Three bones meet to form your knee joint: your thigh bone (femur), shinbone (tibia), and kneecap (patella). The flexibility of the knee makes it prone to injury.

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ACL Injuries
Three bones meet to form your knee joint: your thigh bone (femur), shinbone (tibia), and kneecap (patella). Your kneecap sits in front of the joint to provide some protection. Bones are connected to other bones by ligaments. There are four primary ligaments in your knee. They act like strong ropes to hold the bones together and keep your knee stable.
An ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) injury is one of the most common and well-known orthopedic injuries. The ACL is a very important ligament because it prevents the tibia (shin bone) from sliding in front of the femur (thigh bone). The ACL stabilizes the knee while walking, running, jumping, and moving from side to side. The posterior collateral ligament is within the knee and prevents the femur from sliding off the anterior edge of the tibia and to prevent the tibia from displacing posterior (similar to the anterior cruciate ligament ) and is not as commonly injured.
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MCL | LCL Injuries
Three bones meet to form your knee joint: your thigh bone (femur), shinbone (tibia), and kneecap (patella). Your kneecap sits in front of the joint to provide some protection. Bones are connected to other bones by ligaments. There are four primary ligaments in your knee. They act like strong ropes to hold the bones together and keep your knee stable. The medial collateral ligament is on the inside and the lateral collateral ligament is on the outside. They control the sideways motion of your knee and brace it against unusual movement.
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Meniscal Tear
The femur (thigh bone) and tibia (shin bone) come together to form the knee joint. The joint is the largest in the body. It supports, stabilizes, and moves the lower body. The meniscus is an important piece of soft cartilage in the knee joint. The meniscus is located between the femur and tibia—serving as a shock absorber that distributes weight and protects the bones from rubbing against each other. A meniscus tear occurs when a piece of the meniscus is torn.

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Knee Osteoarthritis
The knee is the largest joint in the body, and one of the most easily injured. It is made up of four main structures: bones, cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. Three bones meet to form your knee joint: your thigh bone (femur), shinbone (tibia), and kneecap (patella). Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common orthopedic conditions. It is characterized by the wear and tear of knee cartilage with age. Knee bone becomes inflamed as cartilage loses its integrity and function. Painful bone spurs may develop. Joint space decreases.

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Patellofemoral Pain
The patella or kneecap is a small bone that protects the knee and connects the large thigh muscles to the tibia or shin bone. Patellofemoral pain, which is also referred to as “runner’s knee” or “jumper’s knee”, describes pain near the front of the knee and around the patella (kneecap). Usually, patellofemoral pain is caused by abnormal kneecap alignment and/or overuse. Athletes and active individuals are most at risk; however, anyone can experience patellofemoral pain.

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Patella Fracture
The patella or kneecap is a small bone that protects the knee and connects the large thigh muscles to the tibia or shin bone. A patella fracture is an impact injury that breaks the patella into two or more parts.

Different types of patella fractures are:

  • Stable nondisplaced fracture. Fractured bone pieces remain very close.
  • Displaced fracture. Fractured bone pieces separate and do not line up properly.
  • Comminuted fracture. The patella is shattered into three or more pieces.
  • Open fracture. The patella breaks and sticks out of the skin.

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Patella Tendon Tear
The patellar tendon attaches the bottom of the kneecap (patella) to the top of the shinbone (tibia). It is actually a ligament that connects to two different bones, the patella and the tibia. The patella is attached to the quadriceps muscles by the quadriceps tendon. Working together, the quadriceps muscles, quadriceps tendon and patellar tendon straighten the knee. The patella tendon can be partially or completely torn.
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Patellar Instability
The patella (kneecap) attaches to the femur (thigh bone) and tibia (shin bone) by tendons. When the knee bends, the patella slides evenly up and down within a v-shaped groove (trochlea) at the end of the femur (thigh bone). In some people, the patella is pulled out of the groove towards the outside of the knee causing patella instability, sometimes referred to as patella subluxation.

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Baker's Cyst
The knee is the largest joint in the body, and one of the most easily injured. It is made up of four main structures: bones, cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. Three bones meet to form your knee joint: your thigh bone (femur), shinbone (tibia), and kneecap (patella). A Baker’s cyst or popliteal cyst is a small benign (non-cancerous) cyst on the back of the knee. A Baker’s cyst forms when knee joint-lubricating synovial fluid builds up in the back of the knee.

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Schedule An Appointment

To receive an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment plan, please make an appointment with one of our Orthopedic Team Specialists at our offices conveniently located in Anchorage and Wasilla, AK.
Anchorage: (907) 782-4729
Wasilla: (907) 885-2559

OPA Knee Team

(click a provider to view profile)

Deryk Anderson, DO

Orthopedic Specialist

Tucker Drury, MD

Orthopedic Specialist

Robert Hall, MD

Orthopedic Specialist

Christopher Manion, MD

Orthopedic Specialist

Jeff Moore, MD

Orthopedic Specialist

Eli Powell, MD

Orthopedic Specialist

Greg Schweiger, MD

Orthopedic Specialist

Our Mission

To provide the finest orthopedic surgery and musculoskeletal care in North America, offering general and specialized adult care to all Alaskans and visitors.

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