Shoulder

Conditions & Treatments
Anchorage: (907) 782-4729
Wasilla: (907) 885-2559
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Contact & Locations
The shoulder joint is capable of a wider range of motion than any other joint in the body. It’s also susceptible to a wide range of injuries and conditions.
OPA offers comprehensive treatment options for every shoulder condition from simple sprains and tendonitis to complex rotator cuff injuries and osteoarthritic conditions requiring total replacement.

Common Shoulder Conditions

Shoulder Pain
The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint that consists of several interconnected parts. The acromioclavicular (AC) joint connects the upper part of the shoulder blade to the collarbone, or clavicle. The glenohumeral joint connects the shoulder socket, or glenoid, which extends from the shoulder blade, to the arm bone, or humerus. The shoulders flexibility can make it prone to injury.

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Shoulder Arthritis
The head of the humerus, the glenoid cavity of the scapula, and clavicle form the ball and socket shoulder joint. The joint is very important because it helps move the arm. Like all joints of the body, the shoulder is susceptible to arthritis, a disease characterized by the wear and tear of joint bone and cartilage.

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Shoulder Tendonitis
The shoulder is the most mobile joint of the body. The head of the humerus (arm bone) and glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade) form the ball and socket joint. The joint is held in place by the rotator cuff tendons and the soft tissue glenoid labrum. Shoulder tendonitis is the inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons. The tendons stabilize the shoulder and help it move. They become irritated and inflamed when overused.

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Shoulder Instability
The humerus (arm bone), the glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade), and clavicle (collarbone) are the bones that make up the shoulder joint. Important structures that stabilize the joint are:

  • Ligaments connect bones to bones.
  • Tendons connect muscles to bones.
  • The glenoid labrum helps the humerus fit perfectly in the glenoid cavity.

An injury to any of these important structures can cause shoulder instability. Common injuries are rotator cuff, glenoid labrum partial and complete tears.

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Shoulder Bursitis
The shoulder is a ball and socket joint made up of the humerus, scapula, and clavicle bones. The shoulder bursae are small fluid-filled sacs that rest between the bones. The bursae are important because they prevent the bones from rubbing directly against one another. Shoulder bursitis, which is inflammation of the bursae, is a common condition.

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Frozen Shoulder Syndrome
The humerus, scapula, and clavicle bones form the shoulder joint. The shoulder capsule is a band of connective tissue that covers the head of the humerus and glenoid cavity of the scapula. The shoulder capsule helps stabilize the shoulder. Synovial fluid inside the capsule helps the move the shoulder.

Frozen shoulder occurs when the shoulder capsule thickens, adhesions form and synovial fluid decreases. Frozen shoulder occurs gradually over several months or years

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Shoulder Impingement Syndrome
The shoulder is the most mobile joint of the body. The head of the humerus (arm bone) and glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade) form the ball and socket joint. The joint is held in place by the rotator cuff tendons and the soft tissue glenoid labrum. Shoulder Impingement Syndrome is a condition where the patients have often pain related to inflammation around the rotator cuff tendon and bursa, which may be caused by poor shoulder mechanics or an abnormal anatomy, which puts them at risk for this condition.

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Shoulder Sprain
The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint that consists of several interconnected parts. The acromioclavicular (AC) joint connects the upper part of the shoulder blade to the collarbone or clavicle. The glenohumeral joint connects the shoulder socket, or glenoid, which extends from the shoulder blade to the arm bone, or humerus. The shoulders flexibility can make it prone to injury. This often happens when stress is placed on the tissues that stabilize the shoulder.

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Shoulder Fracture
The shoulder is a complex joint connecting the arm to the body. The shoulder bones include the humerus (upper arm bone), the scapula (shoulder blade) and the clavicle (collarbone). The upper end of the humerus has a ball-like shape that connects with the socket of the scapula, called the glenoid. Disruption of any of the parts of the shoulder can create difficulty with its function. There are three types of shoulder fractures; clavicle, scapula, and proximal humerus.

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Shoulder Dislocation
The shoulder is the most mobile joint of the body. The head of the humerus (arm bone) and glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade) form the ball and socket joint. The joint is held in place by the rotator cuff tendons and the soft tissue glenoid labrum. A partial dislocation (subluxation) means the head of the upper arm bone (humerus) is partially out of the socket (glenoid). A complete dislocation means it is all the way out of the socket.

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Rotator Cuff Tear
The shoulder is the most mobile joint of the body. The head of the humerus (arm bone) and glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade) form the ball and socket joint. The joint is held in place by the rotator cuff tendons and the soft tissue glenoid labrum. The rotator cuff tendons stabilize the shoulder and help it move. A rotator cuff tear occurs when one or more of the rotator cuff tendons are torn. Tendon tears can be partial or complete. They are grouped into non-degenerative and degenerative categories.

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Shoulder Labrum Tear
The labrum, a circular piece of cartilage that surrounds the glenoid cavity of the scapula, it is one of the most important parts of the shoulder joint. A healthy labrum helps the head of the humerus fit perfectly in the glenoid cavity—stabilizing and moving the shoulder. A SLAP (superior labrum anterior and posterior) tear is the most common labrum injury.

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AC Joint Injury
The acromion of the scapula (shoulder blade) and clavicle (collarbone) form the AC joint. The AC joint rests on the top of the shoulder—protecting it and helping it move. AC joint injuries occur with the ligament that connects the acromion and clavicle is sprained or torn.

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Schedule An Appointment

To receive an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment plan, please make an appointment with one of our Orthopedic Team Specialists at our offices conveniently located in Anchorage and Wasilla, AK.
Anchorage: (907) 782-4729
Wasilla: (907) 885-2559

OPA Shoulder Team

(click a provider to view profile)

Deryk Anderson, DO

Orthopedic Specialist

Tucker Drury, MD

Orthopedic Specialist

Robert Hall, MD

Orthopedic Specialist

Christopher Manion, MD

Orthopedic Specialist

Jeff Moore, MD

Orthopedic Specialist

Eli Powell, MD

Orthopedic Specialist

Greg Schweiger, MD

Orthopedic Specialist

Our Mission

To provide the finest orthopedic surgery and musculoskeletal care in North America, offering general and specialized adult care to all Alaskans and visitors.

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